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Some experts hold that men and women are mutually combative and that this behavior should be seen as part of a larger pattern of family conflict.

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Interestingly, males involved in relationships in which one or both partners reported physical aggression had a perception of less power than males in relationships without physical aggression.

Meanwhile, the girls reported no perceived difference in power regardless of whether their relationships included physical aggression.[18] It is interesting to note that adults who perpetrate violence against family members often see themselves as powerless in their relationships.

These studies tend to show that women report perpetrating slightly more physical violence than men.[12] It is interesting to note that most studies on teen dating violence that have been conducted to date have relied primarily on "act" scales. Cascardi, "Gender Differences in Dating Aggression Among Multiethnic High School Students," 12 (1997): 546-568. [15] Dobash, "The Myth." [16] Archer, "Sex Differences." [17] Wekerle, C., and D. Wolfe, "Dating Violence in Mid-Adolescence: Theory, Significance, and Emerging Prevention Initiatives," 115 (1994): 197-209.

Another group of experts holds that men generally perpetrate serious intimate partner violence against women. O'Leary, "Multivariate Models of Men's and Women's Partner Aggression," 75 (2007): 752-764). [10] Molidor, "Gender and Contextual Factors." [11] Ackard, D.

Most of the practitioners in attendance — representing national organizations, schools and victim service community-based agencies — said that they primarily see female victims, and when they discuss teen dating violence with students, they hear that boys are the primary perpetrators. Because teen dating violence has only recently been recognized as a significant public health problem, the complex nature of this phenomenon is not fully understood.